Verrès

Verrès

Today too, the River Dora Bàltea will remain close to us again. Shortly before Verrès, we will even walk close to its shores, on the left hand side first, then on the other side. The River has been growing in volume since we first met the Dora, last inflows short before Verrès were the river Chalamy from the south side and then the river Evançon from the north side in Verrès itself. By the way in the Aosta valley, people speak French and/or Italian, so names can be found in both languages.
leaving Châtillon

leaving Châtillon

The first major site on this stage is Saint-Vincent, which also is a well suited place to spend a night. The Dorea Bàltea, which has been flowing east until here, does turn right now, will therefore flow south, and we do follow that direction as well. In Chenal, the local castle is worth to look at for a moment, before we continue towards Montjovet. There, we will be impressed by the Montjovet fortress (also called Castello die St.Germain), constructed on a rock , built in the 11th century, and enhanced in 1534.

Saint-Vincent

Saint-Vincent

The current main trail from here on leads over a hill with a culmination point at 750 m.o.s. to todays destination Verrès. However, there is an alternate trail with approximately the same length, but a cummulated ascent of 200 meters less. Verrès has a set of medieval buildings which have survived the centuries, e.g. a convent dating back to 925, the castle Verrès built in 1390 or the church whose oldest parts date back to the 16th century.

Note(s)

The «Via Francigena» is one of the 3 main christian pilgrimage trails of the Middle Ages, the main axis leading from Canterbury to Rome. This documentation currently covers the most frequented section from Lausanne to Rome.